Monthly Archives: August 2021

Lawn Mowing Tricks No One Ever Told You

When to Start Mowing in the Spring | The Turfgrass Group Inc

Mowing the grass is a pretty straightforward task, but are you unintentionally making the chore harder than it needs to be? Follow these 10 tips from Lowe’s to make mowing the lawn easier for you and more beneficial for your grass.

Sharpen the Blades

At first you may think this tip simply lengthens your to-do list, but sharp blades prevent you from having to make multiple passes. A quick investment of your time at the start of summer can make mowing the lawn easier all season long.

Top Off the Tank

There’s nothing more annoying than running out of fuel mid-mow. Plus, you’re advised not to refuel a hot lawn mower. If you think the tank is running low, remember to top it off before you start the mower next time.

Check the Lawn for Debris

The last thing you need is for a rock, stick or baseball to dull your lawn mower’s freshly sharpened blades. To prevent frustration and potential injury, clear these items from the grass before you start mowing.

Time Your Mowing Just Right

The best time of day to mow is when it’s cool outside, so in the morning or evening. Mowing when it’s cool helps keep moisture in the roots where it’s needed. It also reduces the chance of heat exhaustion.

Still, the evening is preferable to the morning, because this gives the grass 12 hours of darkness to heal before the sun comes up. The grass also tends to be dewy or wet from being watered in the morning, and you shouldn’t mow when the grass is wet for your own personal safety and the health of your grass.

Keep the Grass Long Enough

You may think giving your grass an extreme cut will prolong the time until you need to mow again, but cutting more than one-third of the blade at a time can damage the grass. Plus, longer blades shade the ground, which slows evaporation and helps prevent weeds from sprouting. In this way, more frequent, less extreme cuts result in a healthier lawn and fewer weeds.

Keep Grass Even Longer in the Shade

Longer grass signifies longer roots. Since grass growing under a tree must compete with tree roots for water and nutrients, help the grass stay as healthy as possible by leaving it longer than the grass growing in full sun.

Rethink Your Mowing Schedule

It’s easy to cut the grass on a set weekly schedule, but keep in mind that hot, dry weather slows the growth of cool-season grass. In these conditions, you’ll be happy to hear you can mow less frequently without harming the grass.

Speaking of schedules, check out these cleaning schedules, checklists and charts from Molly Maid, a fellow Neighborly company!

Change Up Your Mowing Pattern

You may fall into the habit of always mowing along the same route, but since grass tends to lean in the direction you mow, you’ll encourage more upward growth and avoid ruts if you switch up the way you mow each time with different mowing patterns.

Skip the Bag

Do you think leaving grass clippings behind looks messy? Maybe so, but this organic fertilizing technique returns nitrogen and other valuable nutrients to the soil. Make sure you shoot grass clippings onto areas you’ve already mowed as a free way to promote a healthier lawn.

Use Caution on Hills

If you have a steep yard, never mow straight up and down. This could make you slip and injure yourself. For easier lawn mowing and a reduced chance of injury, mow from side to side across the hill.

Low Maintenance Lawn Care Services in Minneapolis

Benefits Of Aeration And Overseeding

benefits of aeration and overseeding

There are many benefits of aeration and overseeding. These two important services are beneficial to repair the wear and tear that summer fun inflicted on your lawn. Fall is the best time to rejuvenate your turf for a lawn you can love next spring.

Benefits of Aeration and Overseeding: What Is Aeration?

Soil can become compacted over any number of reasons. Compacted soil becomes harder for water to get through to the soil, which can stunt grass growth. Aeration gives the grass access to air and water, allowing deeper and stronger root growth. It is essential to aerate during active growth times for optimal results.  

What Does Aeration Do For My Lawn?

Aeration breaks up the layering of compacted soil, allowing water, nutrients, and fertilizer to flow through easily and reach the roots. The holes created by core aeration in the soil allow roots to expand, resulting in improved turf quality and vitality.

How Do I Know If I Need To Aerate My Lawn?

Your lawn might need aeration if:

  • Your yard experiences heavy foot traffic. Pets and children running around the yard contribute to soil compaction. 
  • Your yard consistently dries out quickly and has a spongy feel when you walk upon it. This issue might mean that your lawn has a thatch problem, and water is not dispersing into the soil as it should. 
  • There are puddles through-out your lawn. Pools of water are a tattle-tale sign that water is not dispersing into your soil as it should. 

What Are The Benefits Of Aeration and Overseeding?

Benefits of Aeration and Overseeding What Does Aeration Do To My Lawn
  • Core aeration loosens the soil, allowing water, air, and nutrients to reach the roots and be absorbed.
  • Aeration improves seed germination. Seeds germinate easily in aerator holes.
  • Overseeding can introduce new grass seed to fill in bare areas and thicken existing turf.
  • Overseeding increases resistance to insect damage and lawn disease.
  • Aeration and overseeding decrease weeds which germinate in weak areas
  • Aeration and overseeding can improve the beauty and enjoyment of the yard.

When Is The Best Time To Have Your Lawn Aerated and Overseeded?

Fall is the perfect time to aerate and seed a new lawn or overseed an existing one. The mixture of warm days and cool nights with sufficient moisture in the ground creates the ideal growing conditions for grass seed. 

If you are ready to make your fall core aeration and overseeding appointment, call us today or fill out our contact form.

Charcoal vs. Gas Grills: Which Is Better?

Charcoal Grill Vs Gas Grill : Pros And Cons - For Your Grill

Charcoal vs. gas grill, also known as the “Great Debate.” Our simple pros and cons list will help you decide which grill is best for your family.

Everyone has their own opinion when it comes to charcoal and gas grilling. Which type of grill is the best? Is there a correct choice for whipping up amazing grilling recipes? Rather than guessing which to use at your next cookout, we’ve rounded up the pros and cons of charcoal and gas grills so you can make a well-informed decision for what will be the tastiest choice of the summer.

Charcoal Grills

How to Cook on a Charcoal Grill - Consumer Reports

According to some die-hard barbecue fans, the only way to grill is with charcoal. Charcoal provides that rich, smoky flavor that, even with an attached smoker box, gas just can’t meet. Learn more about how to use a charcoal grill.

Pros of charcoal grills:

  • Typically, charcoal grills reach a higher temperature than gas grills. A grill has to reach a temperature of at least 600 degrees Fahrenheit to achieve a nice sear on your meat. This is no problem for a kettle grill filled with red-hot charcoals as it can reach 700 degrees Fahrenheit. While there are gas grills that can reach higher temperatures, they’re usually on the pricier end.
  • You get that scrumptious, smoky flavor. Ever wonder how charcoal grills give so much flavor? Turns out, that higher heat is key. When the drippings from your steak, chicken or veggies fall on the hot coals, they turn into flavor-packed steam and smoke that goes right back into the meat, resulting in the amazingly unique taste of charcoal grilling.
  • They are easier on your wallet. A basic charcoal grill will run you about $25, while a moderately priced one can be found for around $150. Of course, higher-end models go up from there, but in comparison, charcoal grills are far less expensive than gas grills which usually cost between $130-$300.

Cons of charcoal grills:

  • Longer heat up time. Charcoal grills, on average, take about 15-20 minutes to reach the proper cooking temperature (not including the time it takes to light the charcoal), whereas gas grills instantly light up and take about 10 minutes to reach cooking temperature. There are a few different ways to start a charcoal grill, too.
  • Fuel cost adds up. A 20-pound propane cylinder can provide around 25 days of cooking time, whereas a 20-pound bag of charcoal will only yield three grilling sessions. The type of charcoal you cook with can change the way your food tastes as well. Clean-burning hardwood/lump charcoal can go for $35 to $40 for a 20-pound bag.
  • The cleanup is a bit more cumbersome. As opposed to the gas grill that only needs a quick scrub with a brush, a charcoal grill has to be emptied of its used ashes before it can be scrubbed. Be sure to follow these grill cleaning tips, too.

Gas Grills

How To Use a Gas Grill - The Home Depot

There’s no denying how convenient gas grills are in terms of start-up and temperature control, but that ease comes with a price.

Pros of gas grills:

  • They are better for you and the environment. It’s scientifically proven! In regards to your health, The Healthy says opt for a gas grill. Why? Because gas-grilled meats contain fewer carcinogens compared to char-kissed charcoal-grilled meats. As for the environment, it’s been studied that gas grills’ carbon footprint is about one-third of charcoal grills’ carbon footprint.
  • Quick start-up and temperature control. With a simple press of the ignition button and a turn of the dial, your gas grill will spark to life. After a quick preheat, you’ll be ready to grill, rather than having to wait for coals to heat up. You can also go from low heat needed for bone-in chicken to searing hot for kebobs or steak without having to worry about moving around hot coals, too. (By the way, here’s the difference between propane and natural gas).
  • Versatility. With a gas grill, you can easily cook delicate foods such as fruit and vegetables without the worry of overpowering the food with the smoke flavor that comes along with charcoal grilling.

Cons of gas grills:

  • Assembly time. As opposed to the charcoal grill that can be set up in a jiffy, a mid-range gas model is a bit more complicated to assemble and hook up to a propane tank.
  • Safety. While there are safety precautions to follow with any form of cooking, you have to be extra careful when cooking with a gas grill. Always make sure that your propane tank is properly attached without leaks, your grill is at least ten feet from your home and deck and that the grill is free from grease. Not sure how to best clean your grill? Follow this simple grill cleaning check-list that’ll leave your grill looking brand-new!
  • Portability. Though travel-sized gas grills are available, it would be much too difficult, and dangerous, to tow a full-sized gas grill around to the park or the beach.

The Bottom Line

Charcoal and gas grills each have their pro and cons, but only you can decide which would be best for your family and lifestyle. With so many delicious grilling recipes to cook up this summer, you can’t go wrong either way.

How to Grill Burgers: 8 Secrets Every Cook Should Know